History and Gaming

MoAGamingBannerThe Authenticity of Experience:

History and Gaming

Panel with:

Dr Rowan Tulloch (Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies, Macquarie University), Daniel Keogh (Educational Games Designer, 3P Learning), and Abbie Hartman (Modern History, Macquarie University)

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Gaming provides an interactive portal into ‘realities’ external to our own. Games allow us to travel in time and access interactive history: the player becomes a participant in events. Though virtual, these worlds may offer us the opportunity for authentic experiences of past environments and situations. Immersive technologies encourage a richer phenomenological engagement, one which asks us not only to understand, but to feel our way into history. As such these platforms achieve a unique dialogue between the present and the past.  This panel asks how we interact with games with historical content, and the role they play in articulating understandings of history: can a game’s rendering of history alter how we view the past? To what extent does creative license effect gaming communities’ understandings of history? To what degree can games be an educational tool? What happens when we we gamify history? If games create an alternative reality in the present, can they create alternative pasts?

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On the 2nd of November 2017, we co-organised a panel on ‘History and Gaming’ with Dr Tanya Evans, Director of the the Centre for Applied History. The event was also supported by the Macquarie University Ancient Cultures Research Centre.

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Malcolm Choat, Tanya Evans, Rowan Tulloch, Daniel Keogh, Abbie Hartman, Rachel Yuen-Collingridge, and Lauren Dundler at the ‘History and Gaming Event’.

For this event, we chose a range of speakers, representing different perspectives from industry, history, and media studies. Our panel featured Dr Rowan Tulloch (Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies, Macquarie University), Daniel Keogh (Educational Games Designer, 3P Learning), and Abbie Hartman (Modern History, Politics, and International Relations, Macquarie University).IMG_20171102_183217_01

A large audience from a variety of backgrounds, including students, industry representatives, educational professionals from across Sydney, attended the event, which was preceded by a reception sponsored by the Faculty of Arts ‘Modes of Communication’ Research Theme, and followed by a wide-ranging Q&A.

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Below you can find videos of the  presentations by Rowan, Daniel, and Abbie, thanks to the generosity of the Centre for Applied History.